hybrid chic: made of intergalactic afro dust. finds art, literature + culture sumptuous. writes uncanny art + culture interviews. indulges in peculiarity as eic + creative director of @neonVmag.

celibacy is not just a matter of not having sex. it is a way of admiring a person for their humanity, maybe even for their beauty.
- timothy radcliffe (via neonvmag)
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how i feel when i wake up to conquer my goals + how my night looks, when i have slayed the day!

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Nick Frank Comments
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crush on crew: missin’ my friends [before there was a neonvmag it was just us], these babes continue to stretch me personally + professionally. it’s an overall joy to do life and business with them. now, time to book a trip back to d.c. soon—expect sunglasses + advil! @chronicpearls @chicmakeupgeek @fashionevryweek

crush on crew: missin’ my friends [before there was a neonvmag it was just us], these babes continue to stretch me personally + professionally. it’s an overall joy to do life and business with them. now, time to book a trip back to d.c. soon—expect sunglasses + advil! @chronicpearls @chicmakeupgeek @fashionevryweek

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i saw so much of my transitioning in this ellen lupton interview, def an aha!/confirmation moment for me, switching careers from museums to arts education at 30, moving back to my hometown while still having my heart, hands and mind in the creative world of visual art + indie publishing. i do imagine working with museums in the future though as my heart is so connected to museums! this is such a wonderful interview!

here are a few jewels that i connected to most in relation to my transition:

“You have to be prepared to give creative work 150%. I hear a lot of young people talking about life/work balance, which I think is great when you’re in your 30s. If you’re in your 20s and already talking about that, I don’t think you will achieve your goals. If you really want to build a powerful career, and make an impact, then you have to be prepared to put in blood, sweat, and tears.”





Has there been a point when you’ve decided to take a big risk to move forward?
I think having kids was a big risk. Leaving New York was also big risk.
But you left New York for the opportunity to teach?
I did, but it was still scary to work two jobs and live in two places. My husband and I wanted to have space to breathe, indoors and out, and I wanted to be closer to family and be in a place that was easier to raise kids in, but still a city—I didn’t want to be in the suburbs. It was a really big, really hard decision, but I’m happy with it.
Are your family and friends supportive of what you do?
My family is really supportive, and I’m very close to them. I have a few close friends. As you get older, it becomes harder to make friends; people are already paired off and have strict routines. It’s not the same as when you’re in college. But I’ve worked hard to maintain a couple of very important friendships, which are life-sustaining to me. Overall, I feel like I have enough people around me; I’m able to give them enough care and attention and they support me.
Do you feel a responsibility to contribute to something bigger than yourself?
I think that’s why I do the things I do; they are outward and public. Teaching is very much a giving profession, and I put a lot of mental energy and time into it. Time is all we really have, and teachers give their time to others. The other things I do—writing, lecturing, and curating—are about sharing something of value.
Are you creatively satisfied?
I’d say I’m 80% satisfied. I’m always too busy, but that’s a choice, and, for me, I tend to be more productive that way. When I’m not too busy, I don’t tend to get more done. When you are super-busy, you enter a state of frenzy that can be enormously scary and rewarding and productive. I don’t know that I’d be more satisfied if I only had one job or if I had more time.
Is there anything you’re interested in doing in the next 5 to 10 years?
I want to finish my novel. That’s my one thing I’m working on that’s just for me.
What is it about?
It’s about a young woman in the near future who is entering the design world and having adventures; it’s a satirical, humorous account of life as a designer. Writing fiction is fun, but very labor-intensive. I wish I had more time to spend on it, but it’s my responsibility to make time to do the things I want—I can’t blame anyone else.




What advice would you give to someone starting out?
You have to be prepared to give creative work 150%. I hear a lot of young people talking about life/work balance, which I think is great when you’re in your 30s. If you’re in your 20s and already talking about that, I don’t think you will achieve your goals. If you really want to build a powerful career, and make an impact, then you have to be prepared to put in blood, sweat, and tears. I don’t think everybody is willing to do that, but if you have the opportunity to do so, you should. That’s why many people go to graduate school in their late 20s: it forces them to devote intense time and focus to their work. It’s an experience that will change you forever.
That’s great advice. How does where you live impact your creativity? Or, since you spend time in New York and Baltimore, how does each place influence you?
I love having both places. When I’m in New York, I’m very busy running around and meeting people. I’m not sitting at a desk all day, and that’s exciting for me. In Baltimore, I work from home and at the school, but any real writing or producing happens at home. There are days when I’m in my head, sitting in a beautiful room with views of the trees outside, with my little dogs at my side. Having an environment like that is conducive to work, and it’s really great, but I’d be bored if I couldn’t also get out and be around others.
Speaking of being around others, is it important to you to be part of a creative community?
Yes. Sharing is the whole point of doing creative work. I love being part of a museum and college community; I like doing lectures and being an author because I have readers and the general public to respond to. In return, I also share other people’s work, read their writing, and go to their lectures and exhibitions. Taking part in the community is important.

read the full interview here

i saw so much of my transitioning in this ellen lupton interview, def an aha!/confirmation moment for me, switching careers from museums to arts education at 30, moving back to my hometown while still having my heart, hands and mind in the creative world of visual art + indie publishing. i do imagine working with museums in the future though as my heart is so connected to museums! this is such a wonderful interview!

here are a few jewels that i connected to most in relation to my transition:

“You have to be prepared to give creative work 150%. I hear a lot of young people talking about life/work balance, which I think is great when you’re in your 30s. If you’re in your 20s and already talking about that, I don’t think you will achieve your goals. If you really want to build a powerful career, and make an impact, then you have to be prepared to put in blood, sweat, and tears.”

Has there been a point when you’ve decided to take a big risk to move forward?

I think having kids was a big risk. Leaving New York was also big risk.

But you left New York for the opportunity to teach?

I did, but it was still scary to work two jobs and live in two places. My husband and I wanted to have space to breathe, indoors and out, and I wanted to be closer to family and be in a place that was easier to raise kids in, but still a city—I didn’t want to be in the suburbs. It was a really big, really hard decision, but I’m happy with it.

Are your family and friends supportive of what you do?

My family is really supportive, and I’m very close to them. I have a few close friends. As you get older, it becomes harder to make friends; people are already paired off and have strict routines. It’s not the same as when you’re in college. But I’ve worked hard to maintain a couple of very important friendships, which are life-sustaining to me. Overall, I feel like I have enough people around me; I’m able to give them enough care and attention and they support me.

Do you feel a responsibility to contribute to something bigger than yourself?

I think that’s why I do the things I do; they are outward and public. Teaching is very much a giving profession, and I put a lot of mental energy and time into it. Time is all we really have, and teachers give their time to others. The other things I do—writing, lecturing, and curating—are about sharing something of value.

Are you creatively satisfied?

I’d say I’m 80% satisfied. I’m always too busy, but that’s a choice, and, for me, I tend to be more productive that way. When I’m not too busy, I don’t tend to get more done. When you are super-busy, you enter a state of frenzy that can be enormously scary and rewarding and productive. I don’t know that I’d be more satisfied if I only had one job or if I had more time.

Is there anything you’re interested in doing in the next 5 to 10 years?

I want to finish my novel. That’s my one thing I’m working on that’s just for me.

What is it about?

It’s about a young woman in the near future who is entering the design world and having adventures; it’s a satirical, humorous account of life as a designer. Writing fiction is fun, but very labor-intensive. I wish I had more time to spend on it, but it’s my responsibility to make time to do the things I want—I can’t blame anyone else.


What advice would you give to someone starting out?

You have to be prepared to give creative work 150%. I hear a lot of young people talking about life/work balance, which I think is great when you’re in your 30s. If you’re in your 20s and already talking about that, I don’t think you will achieve your goals. If you really want to build a powerful career, and make an impact, then you have to be prepared to put in blood, sweat, and tears. I don’t think everybody is willing to do that, but if you have the opportunity to do so, you should. That’s why many people go to graduate school in their late 20s: it forces them to devote intense time and focus to their work. It’s an experience that will change you forever.

That’s great advice. How does where you live impact your creativity? Or, since you spend time in New York and Baltimore, how does each place influence you?

I love having both places. When I’m in New York, I’m very busy running around and meeting people. I’m not sitting at a desk all day, and that’s exciting for me. In Baltimore, I work from home and at the school, but any real writing or producing happens at home. There are days when I’m in my head, sitting in a beautiful room with views of the trees outside, with my little dogs at my side. Having an environment like that is conducive to work, and it’s really great, but I’d be bored if I couldn’t also get out and be around others.

Speaking of being around others, is it important to you to be part of a creative community?

Yes. Sharing is the whole point of doing creative work. I love being part of a museum and college community; I like doing lectures and being an author because I have readers and the general public to respond to. In return, I also share other people’s work, read their writing, and go to their lectures and exhibitions. Taking part in the community is important.

read the full interview here
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close up, hair did. “nimbus” ©MMXIV

close up, hair did. “nimbus” ©MMXIV

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brain candy: mentor in my mind.

brain candy: mentor in my mind.

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